Latest Articles (Members Only)
  • 2018 through the Director Lens
    Last year produced a number of high-profile issues that had a profound impact on boardrooms here in Canada and across the globe, thrusting the role of the board even further into the spotlight.

    From the fallout of #MeToo to cybersecurity and issues related to ESG, 2018 churned out diverse new threats and opportunities that reshaped the corporate landscape and board agendas.  









  • ICD members express concern for economy and Canadian political stability in 2019
    The ICD released its latest Director Lens survey on November 28, providing a glimpse into how some of Canada’s leading corporate directors feel about economic and political stability, boards’ oversight of technology, workplace harassment, human capital issues and shareholder engagement.

    The results showed that Directors are concerned about Canada’s economy, with only 28 per cent believing that the economy would improve in the next 2-5 years, a stark contrast to the 52 per cent who believed it would improve a year ago. Furthermore, 45 per cent expressed concern over Canada’s domestic political stability over the next 2 – 5 years, believing it will worsen over that time period, compared to 25 per cent a year ago.  









  • Focus on proxy advisors
    Primarily, proxy advisors provide advice to investors on how to vote for resolutions contained within public company proxy circulars. Recently introduced legislation in the U.S. Congress has focused more attention lately on the industry and reignited a debate over the merits and influence of proxy advisors.








  • The trade diversification imperative: one year into CETA
    At its core, the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), which came into force just over a year ago, lowers tariffs and opens access for Canadian business. Following the upheaval and uncertainty of the past 18 months caused by the NAFTA renegotiations, reducing trade barriers with our second-largest trading partner – and the world’s second largest market – was a critical development.

    According to Jim Carr, Canada’s Minister of International Trade Diversification, CETA allows Canadian consumers to benefit from greater choice of goods and services and provides Canadian companies more buyers for their products. It also addresses things such as labour standards, the removal of unnecessary regulatory requirements, automation of border procedures and many other factors that shape how Canada trades with the EU.









Digital Media (Members Only)
Resources (Members Only)
  • 2018 diversity disclosure practices
    Women in leadership roles at TSX-listed companies
  • 2018 diversity disclosure practices
    Women in leadership roles at TSX-listed companies
  • Hydro One material change report
    On July 11, 2018, Hydro One Limited (“HOL”), on behalf of itself and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Hydro One, announced that following an approach by HOL to the Province of Ontario (the “Province”), they have entered into an agreement for the purpose of the orderly replacement of the board of directors of Hydro One and HOL and the retirement of Mayo Schmidt as the chief executive officer effective July 11, 2018.
  • Hydro One material change report
    On July 11, 2018, Hydro One Limited (“HOL”), on behalf of itself and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Hydro One, announced that following an approach by HOL to the Province of Ontario (the “Province”), they have entered into an agreement for the purpose of the orderly replacement of the board of directors of Hydro One and HOL and the retirement of Mayo Schmidt as the chief executive officer effective July 11, 2018.